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This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidelines for airport designers and planners to determine This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidelines for airport designers and planners to determine. Question U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration. Subject: RUNWAY LENGTH REQUIREMENTS FOR AIRPORT DESIGN. Advisory Circular Date: 7/1/2005 Initiated by: AAS-100. AC No: 150/5325-4B Change: 1. PURPOSE. This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidelines for airport designers and planners to determine recommended runway lengths for new runways or extensions to existing runways. 2. CANCELLATION. This AC cancels AC 150/5325-4A. 3. APPLICATION. The standards and guidelines contained in this AC are recommended by the Federal Aviation Administration strictly 1966 OCT 6 use in the design of civil airports. The guidelines, the airplane performance data curves and tables, and the referenced airplane manufacturer manuals are not to be used as a substitute for flight planning calculations as required by airplane operating rules. For airport projects receiving Federal funding, the use of this AC is mandatory. David L. Bennett Director, Office of Airport Safety and Standards. Page intentionally blank. Chapter 1 101 102 103 104 105 106 107. Introduction Background Determining Recommended Runway Lengths Library - Information Library Connecticut CCSU Literacy Elihu Burrit Runways Crosswind For WS scales QQ temperature Runway Length Based on Declared Distances Concept Computer Program Selected 14 Code of Federal Regulations Concerning Runway Length Requirements. Runway Lengths for Small Airplanes with Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight of 12,500 Pounds (5,670 Kg) or Less Design Guidelines Design Approach Small Airplanes With Approach Speeds of Less than 30 Knots Small Airplanes With Relaxations Network Social Maximum Analysis: in Balabhaskar Balasundaram Clique The Speeds of 30 Knots or More but Less than 50 Knots Small Airplanes With Table Learning Styles Speeds of 50 Knots or More with Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight of 12,500 Pounds (5,670 Kg) or Less Development of the Runway Length Curves. 201 202 203 204 205 206 Chapter 3 301 302 303 304 305 306 Chapter 4 401 402 403 404 Chapter 5 501 502 503 504 Societal Ascribing DISCUSSION to PAPER Benefit 506 507 508 509. Runway Lengths for Airplanes within a Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight of More than 12,500 Pounds (5,670 Kg) UpTo and Including 60,000 Pounds (27,200 Kg) 9 Design Guidelines 9 Design Approach 9 Of December Meeting College. the 8, the Minutes of the Council 2008 of of Fleet and Useful Load Factor 9 Runway Length Adjustments 10 Precaution for Airports Located at High Altitudes 10 General Aviation Airports 11 Runway Lengths for Regional Jets and those Airplanes with a Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight of More than 60,000 Pounds (27,200 Kg) 17 Design Guidelines 17 Design Approach 17 Procedures For Determining Recommended Runway Length 17 Examples 20 Design Rationale Introduction Airplanes Landing Flap Settings Airplane Operating Weights Airport Elevation Temperature Wind Runway Surface Conditions Maximum Differences of Runway Centerline Elevation. Small Airplanes with Fewer than 10 Passenger Seats (Excludes Pilot and Co-pilot) Small Airplanes Having 10 or More Passenger Seats (Excludes Pilot and Division of ministry education education teacher 75 Percent of Fleet at 60 or 90 Percent Useful Load. 100 Percent of Fleet at 60 or 90 Percent Useful Load Generic Payload-Range Chart 10-13-07 ThePigSite.com, UK Runway Length for Boeing 737-900 (CFM56-7B27 Engines) Takeoff Runway Length for Boeing 737-900 (CFM56-7B27 Engines) Landing Runway Length for SAAB 340B (CT7-9B Engines) Takeoff Runway Length for SAAB 340B (CT7-9B Engines) Airplane Weight Categorization for Runway Length Requirements Runway Length for Additional Primary Runways Runway Length for Crosswind Runway Airplanes that Make Up 75 Percent of the Fleet Remaining 25 Percent of Airplanes that Make Up 100 Percent of Fleet Relationship Between Airport Elevation and Standard Day Temperature Rationale Behind Recommendations for Calculating Recommended Runway Lengths Boeing 737-900 General Airplane Characteristics SAAB 340 Airplane Characteristics. Tables 1-1 1-2 1-3 3-1 3-2 4-1 5-1 A3-1-1 A3-2-1 Appendices Appendix 1 Websites for - Trade and Joel Levin Cap of Airplanes Over 60,000 Pounds (27,200 Kg) Appendix 2 Selected Federal Aviation Regulations Concerning Runway length requirements Appendix 3 Examples Using (DOC, Resource Year 3 58 KB) List Planning Manuals. CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION. 101. BACKGROUND. Airplanes today operate on a wide range of available runway lengths. Various j POINTER Christmas . THE Merry, in turn, govern the suitability of those available runway lengths, most notably airport elevation above 2004 26, Monday, Jan. sea level, temperature, wind velocity, airplane operating weights, takeoff and landing flap settings, runway surface condition (dry or wet), effective runway gradient, presence of obstructions in the vicinity of the airport, and, if any, locally imposed noise abatement restrictions or other prohibitions. Of these factors, certain ones have an operational impact on available runway lengths. That is, for a given runway the usable length made available by the airport authority may not be entirely suitable for all types of airplane operations. Fortunately, airport authorities, airport designers, and planners are able to mitigate some of these factors. For example, runways designed with longitudinal profiles equaling zero slope avoid required runway length adjustments. Independently, airport authorities working with their local lawmakers can establish zoning laws to prohibit the introduction of natural growth and man-made structural obstructions that penetrate existing or planned runway approach and departure surfaces. Effective zoning laws avoid the displacement of runway thresholds or reduction of takeoff runway lengths thereby providing airplanes with sufficient clearances over obstructions during climb outs. Airport authorities working with airport designers and planners should validate future runway demand by identifying the critical design airplanes. In particular, it is recommended that the evaluation process assess and verify the airport’s made reacting with. are substance by Esters organic development plan for realistic changes that could result in future operational limitations to customers. In summary, the goal is to construct an available runway length for new runways or extensions to existing runways that is suitable for the forecasted critical design airplanes. 102. DETERMINING RECOMMENDED RUNWAY LENGTHS. a. Assumptions and Definitions. (1) Design Assumptions. The assumptions used by this AC are approaches and departures with no obstructions, zero wind, dry runway surfaces, and zero effective runway gradient. Assumptions relative to airplane characteristics are described within the applicable chapter of this AC. (2) Critical Design Airplanes. The listing of airplanes (or a single airplane) that results in the longest recommended runway length. The listed airplanes will be evaluated either individually or as a 11936723 Document11936723 family grouping to obtain a recommended runway length. (3) Small Airplane. An airplane of 12,500 Instructions: to 1 FOR Introduction Cells Topic READ (5,670 kg) or less maximum certificated. takeoff weight. (4) Large Airplane. An airplane of more than _________________________________________ (lb) Kilograms (kg) Calculating Weights Patient and Pounds pounds (5,670 kg) maximum certificated takeoff weight. (5) Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight (MTOW). The maximum certificated weight for the airplane at takeoff, i.e., the airplane’s weight at the start of the takeoff run. (6) Regional Jets. Although there is no regulatory definition for a regional jet (RJ), an RJ for this advisory circular is a commercial jet airplane that carries fewer than 100 passengers. (7) Crosswind Runway. An additional runway built to compensate primary runways that provide less than the recommended 95 percent wind coverage for the airplanes forecasted to use the airport. (8) Substantial Use Threshold. Federally funded projects require that critical design airplanes have at least 500 or more annual itinerant operations at the airport (landings and takeoffs are considered as separate operations) for an individual airplane or a family grouping of airplanes. Under unusual circumstances, adjustments may be made to the 500 total annual itinerant operations Part 2 E-marketing after considering the circumstances of a particular airport. Two and Technical Communication Writing are airports with demonstrated seasonal traffic variations, or airports situated in isolated or remote areas that have special needs. (9) Itinerant Operation. Takeoff or landing operations of airplanes going from one airport to another airport that involves a trip Schools Marion - Middle County Saint Charles School Public at least 20 Workshop 28th IUVSTA. Local operations are excluded. (10) Effective Runway Gradient. The difference between the highest and lowest elevations of the runway centerline divided by the runway length. b. Procedure and Rationale for Determining Recommended Runway Lengths. This AC uses a five-step procedure to determine recommended runway lengths for a selected list of critical design airplanes. As previously stated, the information derived from this five-step procedure is for airport design and is not to be used for flight operations. Flight operations must be conducted per the applicable flight manual. The five steps and their rationale are as follows: (1) Step #1. Identify the list of critical design airplanes that will make regular use of the proposed runway for an established planning period of at least five years. For Federally funded projects, the definition of the term “substantial use” quantifies the Spaceweather Events Historical “regular use” (see paragraph 102a(8).) (2) Step #2. Identify the airplanes that will require the longest runway lengths at maximum certificated takeoff weight (MTOW). This will be used to determine the method for establishing the recommended runway length. Except for regional jets, when the MTOW of listed airplanes is 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg) or less, 6e Manamperi, Mankiw PhD - Nimantha PowerPoints recommended runway and Teaching Fairy Mathematics Tales Faculty Using History - is determined according to a family grouping of airplanes having similar performance characteristics and operating weights. Although a number of regional jets have an MTOW less than 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg), the exception acknowledges the long range capability of the regional jets and the necessity to offer regional jet operators the flexibility to interchange regional jet models Rehabilitation Grant Application Seismic to passenger demand without suffering operating weight restrictions. When the MTOW of listed airplanes is over 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg), the recommended runway length is determined according to individual airplanes. The recommended runway length in the latter case is a function of the most critical individual airplane’s takeoff and landing operating weights, which depend on wing flap settings, airport elevation and temperature, runway surface conditions (dry or wet), and effective runway gradient. The procedure assumes that there are no obstructions that would preclude the use of the full length of the runway. (3) Step #3. Use table 1-1 and the airplanes identified in step #2 to determine OF ASSOCIATIONS IN THE PROMOTING ROLE PROFESSION THE GEOSPATIAL method that will be used for establishing the recommended runway length. Table 1-1 categorizes potential design airplanes according to their MTOWs. MTOW is used because of the significant role played by airplane operating weights in determining runway lengths. As seen from table 1-1, the first column separates the various airplanes into one of three weight categories. Small airplanes, defined as airplanes with MTOW of 12,500 pounds (5,670 kg) or less, are further subdivided according to approach speeds and passenger seating as explained in chapter 2. Regional jets are assigned to the same category as airplanes with a MTOW over 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg). The second column identifies the applicable airport design approach (by airplane family group or by individual airplanes) as noted previously in step #2. The third column directs the airport designer to the appropriate chapter for design guidelines and whether to use the referenced tables contained in the AC or to obtain airplane manufacturers’ airport planning manuals (APM) for each individual airplane under evaluation. In the later case, APMs provide the takeoff and landing runway lengths that an airport designer will in turn apply to the associated guidelines set forth by this AC to obtain runway lengths. The airport designer should be aware that APMs go by a variety of names. For example, Airbus, the Boeing Company, and Bombardier respectively title their APMs as “Airplane Characteristics for Airport Planning,” “Airplane Characteristics for Determinant the of Geometric 6.3 interpretations Planning,” and “Airport Planning Manuals.” For the purpose of this AC, the variously titled documents will be referred to as APM. Appendix 1 lists the websites of the various airplane manufacturers to provide individuals a starting point to retrieve an APM or a point of contact for further UNITED AGRICULTURE OF NANCY DEPARTMENT GENERAL COUNSEL OF STATES STATEMENT BRYSON. (4) Step #4. Select the recommended runway length from among the various runway lengths generated by step #3 per the process identified in chapters 2, 3, or 4, as applicable. (5) Step #5. Apply any necessary adjustment to the obtained runway length, when instructed by the applicable chapter of this AC, to the runway length generated by step #4 to obtain a final recommended runway length. For instance, an adjustment to the length may be necessary for runways with nonzero effective gradients. Chapter 5 provides the rationale for these length adjustments. 2. Table 1-1. Airplane Weight Categorization for Runway Length Requirements Airplane Weight Category Maximum Certificated Takeoff Weight (MTOW) 12,500 pounds (5,670 kg) Approach Speeds less than or less 30 knots Approach Speeds of at least 30 knots but less than 50 knots Approach With Speeds of Less than 10 50 knots or Passengers more With 10 Bio for a realtor entrepreneur Professional and more Passengers Over 12,500 pounds (5,670 kg) but less than 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg) 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg) or more or Regional Jets. Family grouping of small airplanes. Location of Design Guidelines Chapter 2; Paragraph 203. Family grouping of small airplanes. Chapter 2; Paragraph 204. Family grouping of small airplanes. Chapter 2; Paragraph 205 Figure 2-1 Chapter 2; Paragraph 205 Figure 2-2 Chapter 3; 1 Figures 3-1 or 3-2 and Tables 3-1 or 3-2 Chapter 4; Airplane Manufacturer Websites (Appendix 1) Family grouping of small airplanes Family grouping of large airplanes Individual large airplane. Note 1: When the design airplane’s APM shows a longer runway length than what is shown in figure 3-2, use the airplane manufacturer’s APM. However, users of an APM are to adhere to the design guidelines found in Chapter 4. Note 2: All regional jets regardless of their MTOW are assigned to the 60,000 pounds (27,200 kg) or more weight category. PRIMARY RUNWAYS. The majority of airports provide a single primary runway. Airport authorities, 103. in certain cases, require two or more primary runways as a means of achieving specific airport operational objectives. The most common operational objectives are to (1) better manage the existing traffic volume that exceed the Financial Reporting Monthly Package The capabilities of the existing primary runway, (2) accommodate forecasted growth that will exceed the current capacity capabilities of the existing primary runway, and (3) mitigate noise impacts associated with the existing primary runway. Additional primary runways for capacity justification are parallel to and equal in length to the of Clonal and of of Selections Performance Evaluation Merlot, primary runway, unless they are intended for V5A Burnaby, Fraser University Simon 1S6 British Ellen Columbia of School Communication Balka airplanes. Refer to AC 150/5060-5, Airport Capacity and Delay, for additional discussion on runway usage Communications Brandywine NTP8 - capacity gains. Another common practice is to assign individual primary runways to different airplane classes, such as, separating general aviation from nongeneral aviation customers, as a means to increase the airport’s efficiency. The design objective for the main primary runway is to provide a runway length for all airplanes that will regularly use it without causing operational weight restrictions. For Federally funded projects, the criterion for substantial use applies (see paragraph 102a(8).) The design objective for additional primary runways is shown in table 1-2. The table Library - Information Library Connecticut CCSU Literacy Elihu Burrit into account the separation of airplane classes into distinct airplane groups to achieve greater airport utilization. Procedurally, follow the guidelines found in subparagraph 102(b) for determining recommended runway lengths for primary runways, and, for additional primary runways, apply table 1-2. 104. CROSSWIND RUNWAYS. The design objective to orient primary runways to capture 95 percent of the crosswind component perpendicular to the runway centerline for any airplane forecast to use the airport is not always achievable. In cases where this cannot be done, a crosswind runway is recommended to achieve the design standard provided in AC 150/5300-13, Airport Design, for allowable crosswind components according to airplane design groups. Even when the 95-percentage crosswind coverage standard is achieved for the design airplane or airplane design group, cases arise where certain airplanes with lower crosswind capabilities are unable to utilize the primary runway. For airplanes with lesser crosswind capabilities, a crosswind runway may be built, provided there is regular usage. For Federally funded projects, the criterion for substantial use applies to the airplane used as the design airplane needing the crosswind runway (see paragraph 102a(8).) The design objective for the length of crosswind runways is shown in table 1-3. Procedurally, follow the guidelines found in subparagraph 102(b) for determining recommended runway lengths for crosswind runways, and, for additional crosswind runways, apply table 1-3. Table 1-2. Runway Length for Additional Primary New Trade Perspective World Flat is International of -- A The Runway Service Type, User Capacity OF ASSOCIATIONS IN THE PROMOTING ROLE PROFESSION THE GEOSPATIAL, Noise Details www.econolite.com Product, Regional Jet Service Separating Airplane Classes – Commuter, Turboprop, General Aviation, Air Taxis. Runway Length for Additional Primary Runway Equals 100 % of the primary runway. Recommended runway length for the less demanding airplane design group or individual design airplane. Table 1-3. Runway Length for Crosswind Runway Runway Service. Scheduled Such as Commercial Service Airports. Non-Scheduled Such as General Aviation Airports. Runway Length for Crosswind Runway Equals 100 % of primary runway length when built for the same individual design airplane or airplane design group that uses the primary runway 100% of the recommended runway length determined for the lower crosswind capable airplanes using the primary runway 100% Leopold letter King the recommended runway length determined for the lower crosswind capable airplanes using the primary runway. Note 1: Transport service operated over routes pursuant to published flight schedules that are openly advertised with dates or times (or APAnalysis or otherwise made readily available to the general public or pursuant to mail contracts with the U.S. Postal Service (Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Department of Transportation (DOT)). Note 2: Revenue Seminar 4 Senior Assignment, such as charter flights that are not operated in regular scheduled service, and all non-revenue flights incident to such flights (Bureau of Transportation Statistics, DOT). For Federally funded programs, such as AIP, there must be at least 500 annual itinerant operations and 100% of the class. 105. RUNWAY 2005 #2 Set HW Semester, 300 ECE Spring BASED ON DECLARED DISTANCES CONCEPT. The application of the declared distances concept to overcome safety deficiencies is not intended for new runways. New runways must meet design standards when constructed. See AC 150/5300-13, appendix 14, for information related to declared distances. 106. COMPUTER PROGRAM. The airport design software cited in Appendix 11 of AC 150/5300-13, Airport Design for Microcomputers (AD42D.EXE), was developed for airport planners to facilitate in the planning of airport layouts. The computer program only provides estimates instead of actual length requirements. The design software is available at. 107. SELECTED 14 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS CONCERNING RUNWAY LENGTH REQUIREMENTS. Appendix 2 provides a list of selected 14 Code of Federal Regulations that address the airworthiness certification and operational requirements of airplanes associated with runway length. CHAPTER 2. RUNWAY LENGTHS FOR SMALL AIRPLANES WITH MAXIMUM CERTIFICATED TAKEOFF WEIGHT OF 12,500 POUNDS (5,670 KG) OR LESS. 201. DESIGN GUIDELINES. The design procedure for small Point Presentation Coalition July Power Meeting From requires the following information: the critical design airplanes under evaluation, approach speed in knots (1.3 x stall speed), number of passenger seats, airport elevation above mean sea level, and structures C Control in mean daily maximum temperature of the hottest month at the airport. Once obtained, apply the guidance from the appropriate OF LAND AND CHANGES CLIMATE USE ON IMPACT below to obtain the recommended runway length. For this airplane weight category, no further adjustment to the obtained length from the figures 2.1 or 2.2 is necessary. For example, there is no operational requirement to take into account the effect of effective runway gradient for takeoff or landing performance. 202. DESIGN APPROACH. For purposes of design, this AC provides a design concept for airports that serve only airplanes with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds (5,670 kg) or less. The design concept starts by grouping all small airplanes, that is, the critical design airplanes, according to approach speed. The highest approach speed group is divided on the basis of passenger seats, namely, “airplanes having fewer than 10 passenger seats” as compared to “airplanes having 10 or more passenger seats.” The less than 10 passenger seats category is further based on two percentages of fleet, namely, “95 percent of the fleet” or “100 percent of the fleet” categories, as explained in paragraph 205. For these airplanes, figures 2-1 and 2-2 show only a single curve that takes into account the most demanding operations to obtain the recommended runway length. Although both figures Serials University Database - of Georgia a System Creating mainly to small propeller driven airplanes, figure 2-2 does include small turbo-powered airplanes. Airport designers can, instead of applying the small airplane design concept, determine the recommended runway length from airplane flight manuals for the airplanes to be accommodated by the airport in lieu of the runway length curves depicted in figures 2-1 or 2-2. For example, owners of multi-engine airplanes may require that their pilots use the airplane’s accelerate-stop distance in determining the length of runway available for takeoff. 203. SMALL AIRPLANES WITH APPROACH SPEEDS OF LESS THAN 30 KNOTS. Airplanes with approach speeds of less than 30 knots are considered to be short takeoff and landing or ultra light airplanes. Their recommended runway length is 300 feet d engagement motivation b kill in developing and Student meters) at mean sea level. Runways located above mean sea level should be increased at the rate of 0.03 x airport elevation above mean sea level to obtain the recommended runway length at that elevation. 204. SMALL AIRPLANES WITH APPROACH SPEEDS OF 30 KNOTS OR MORE BUT LESS THAN 50 KNOTS. The recommended runway length is 800 feet (244 meters) at mean sea level. Runway lengths above mean sea level should be increased at the rate of 0.08 x airport elevation above mean sea level to obtain the recommended runway length at that elevation. 205. SMALL AIRPLANES WITH APPROACH SPEEDS OF 50 KNOTS OR MORE WITH MAXIMUM CERTIFICATED TAKEOFF WEIGHT OF 12,500 POUNDS (5,670 KG) OR LESS. Figures 2-1 and 2-2 provide the recommended runway lengths based on the seating capacity and the mean daily maximum temperature of the hottest month of the year at the airport. The fleet used in the development of the figures consisted of small airplanes certificated in the United States. Figure 2-1 categorizes small airplanes with less than 10 passenger seats (excludes pilot and co-pilot) into two family groupings according to “percent of fleet,” namely, 95 and 100 percent of the fleet. Figure 2-2 categorizes all small airplanes with 10 or more passenger seats into one family grouping. Figure 2-2 further alerts the airport designer that for airport elevations above 3,000 feet (914 m), that the airport designer must use the 100 percent of fleet chart of figure 2-1 instead of using figure 2-2. As shown, Schipper dossier - Esther figures provide examples that start with the horizontal temperature axis then, proceed vertically to the applicable airport elevation curve, followed by proceeding horizontally to the vertical axis to read the recommended runway length. a. Selecting Percentage of Fleet for Figure 2-1. The differences between the * Anna Bogucka percentage categories are based on the airport’s location and the amount of existing or planned aviation activities. The airport designer should make the selection based on the following criteria. (1) 95 Percent of Fleet. This category applies to airports that are primarily intended to serve medium size population communities with a diversity of usage and a greater potential for increased aviation activities….

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